I suspect you have heard of the story of Sisyphos. The poor being had to roll a stone up a hill only to discover that every time he reached the top the stone would roll back into the valley for him to repeat this task until his death. While nature conservationist and wilderness advocates rescue wild animals and natural areas from devastations others show no remorse in destroying the same areas or kill the protected animals.

Europe is trying hard to get the wolf to repopulate all of Europe. While this animal is very shy of humans, it plays an active and vital role in the ecosystem. Regardless of the scientific knowledge,  quite a few Europeans would like to stop this and do not hesitate to ignore the current law and trap or shoot them at first sight. Italians slaughtered just a few months ago a whole wolf pack.

Since 1989, the Italian Monte Adone Centre for Conservation and Research of Exotic and Wild Fauna rescues, cures and rehabilitate the injured indigenous wildlife animals found in the Emilia Romagna Region, Italy.

On January 9, 2012 the wolf Navarre was recovered from the icy waters of a river in very dramatic conditions: undernourished, with a paralysis of the hind limbs and with [highlight color=”yellow”].35 lead pellets in his body[/highlight]. After several diagnostic tests, two weeks of intensive care in the infirmary, monitored 24 hours, Navarre started to walk. He was transferred to another enclosure of the Centre, suitable for his rehabilitation, which requires a gradual recovery of motor function without subjecting him to excessive physical effort.
It’s still a long way, but the wolf Navarre, thanks to his incredible will to live and care he received from these fellow wilderness advocates, started to walk again giving good signs of recovery. he will be soon released into the wilderness again and lets hope that the hunters realize that the wolf deserves our respect and support and is a valuable ally in our continued fight for intact ecosystems.

 

 

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About Author

Max A. E. Rossberg is an avid WIlderness Advocates with extensive experience in Sustainable Tourism Strategies and Multistakeholder planning processes.

1 Comment

  1. Dario Botti on

    Hi everyone!
    I would like to add some data about wolf in Emilia-Romagna Region (Italy). I think such data could be interesting.
    Wolf population in this Region counts some 200 individuals in 40 packs. The territory interested by presence of wolf is some 11,500 square kilometers, principally hills and mountains. However wolf territory can involve plain areas close to hills, like the “Taro Natural Regional Park”.
    In Parma Province, hills and mountains occupy about 2,100 square kilometers. According to website http://www.ambienteparma.it in the period between March 2008 and March 2013,the wild animal rescue center CRAS (Centro di recupero animali selvatici) of “Boschi di Carrega Natural Regional Park” collected 23 wolves from provincial territory and 2 wolves from other areas:
    – 7 individuals involved in collision with cars;
    – 4 individuals poisoned (1 rescued);
    – 6 individuals perhaps poisoned;
    – 2 individuals injuried by firearm
    – 4 individuals debilitated;
    – 2 puppies taken in the den and then released in the wild.
    In the 70’s wolf’s territory in Emilia-Romagna was located only in Casentinesi State Forests (actually Foreste Casentinesi National Park). Following land abandoning and subsequent rewilding (with the return of big herbivores), although the presence of many human enemies, wolves were able to recolonize entire Northern Apennine and spread to Alps and further.

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